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Fire service pay tribute to London high rise victims

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Tragic: The fire in London this morning (Jun 14)

MID AND WEST WALES FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE have paid tributes to the victims of the tragic fire in London today (Jun 14).

Chris Davies, Chief Fire Office of Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service said: ”As the terrible events in London are still unfolding and the circumstances of today’s incident remain unclear, our thoughts are with those who have lost their lives, been affected by this incident or are responding from London Fire Brigade or as part of the wider multi agency response. This incident has been traumatic and challenging for all those concerned.

“At this stage, we do not yet know what caused the fire, where it started or how it has spread in such a way. As such, it’s important that we do not try and speculate on these key questions and allow those who are conducting the investigation to come to their conclusions. However, there is some important advice that we can share with those that live in high rise properties across mid and west Wales.”

The fire service advice is as follows:

  • If you live in a high rise property, you are no more at risk of a fire starting. Our advice is that people who live in high rise properties / purpose built flats or maisonettes, aside from having a working smoke alarm and taking fire safety precautions, is to make sure you know your escape route and what to do if there is a fire inside your home of somewhere else in the building.
  • Never prop or wedge doors open. The exterior doors of your home are specially designed to resist fire and stop the spread of smoke. However, to do this, they must be kept closed when they are not in use. It is also a good idea to close your internal doors when you retire for the night.
  • Make sure that your escapes routes, inside and outside of your flat, are kept clear of obstacles at all times.
  • Know where your keys are – vital time needed to escape may be lost if you have to scramble around looking for them.

If the smoke alarm sounds:

  • Don’t open doors looking for the source of the fire.
  • Alert everyone else and leave the flat, closing the door behind you.
  • Don’t stop to gather personal belongings or pets.
  • Don’t use a balcony to escape unless it’s part of an official escape route.
  • When you are out of the building, find a phone and call 999 – and remember to keep calm and speak clearly.
  • Never go back into the building until you have been told it is safe to do so.

If a fire breaks out elsewhere in the building:

  • It will normally be safe for you to stay in your own flat. Open a window if you need fresh air, and stay by the window where you may been seen. If your own flat becomes affected by smoke, leave at once, closing windows and doors behind you.
  • If you have to leave the building, always use the staircase and never use the lift.
  • If you have to move through smoke, keep as close to the floor as you can, where the air is fresher.
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Llanelli: Multi-agency response to incident on New Dock Road

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POLICE, paramedics and a rapid response medical team from the Wales Air Ambulance base in Llanelli are responding this afternoon (May 20) to a casualty outside the Chinese takeaway on New Dock Road.

The incident took place at around 1700 HRS, and officers cordoned off the area as a single casualty was treated for serious injuries.

One witness told the Llanelli Herald: “There was a fight, someone ended up with serious injuries and is about to be air lifted to hospital.”

Those reports have not yet been verified by police.

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Emergency services respond: New Dock Road, Llanelli (Pics: J Waite/Herald)

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£5,000 of damage caused to solar panels

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DYFED-POWYS POLICE is investigating criminal damage to solar panels at CK’s supermarket, Llanelli, expected to cost £5000 to fix.

The panels were smashed sometime between 5pm on Tuesday (May 15) and 1pm on Wednesday (May 16).

Anyone with information is urged to contact PC 531 Brown by calling 101.

If you are Deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired text the non-emergency number on 07811 311 908. Quote reference: DPP/0038/16/05/2018/01/C

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Police officers to have spit and bite guards from today

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FROM today (May 18) front-line police officers across Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire and Powys will be equipped with spit and bite guards.

Spit and bite guards, made from a loose-fitting, lightweight mesh fabric, are placed over a person’s head to help minimise the risks of diseases and injuries associated with spitting and biting.

This means if someone spits or bites, or threatens to spit or bite, officers have a new piece of equipment to protect themselves and others.

Assistant Chief Constable Richard Lewis said: “Both spitting and biting are a particularly unpleasant form of assault and should not be considered by anyone to be an acceptable part of the job. Figures show there were 77 spit and bite incidents against Dyfed-Powys Police officers and staff in 2017 alone – more than six per month, on average.

“Assaults by spitting and biting can have long-term and distressing implications for officers, who sometimes have to take medication for many weeks afterwards to prevent infection.

“Use of force tactics, such as spit and bite guards, are there to protect not only the public but also for the safety of our officers, who face dangerous situations every day.

“It is imperative that we employ proportionate and appropriate tactics in each situation we face in order to achieve our number one objective, protecting the public.

“Our officers go through rigorous and continued training on tactics which are considered by the Home Office as a use of force. Officers are highly trained to use force proportionately, lawfully and only when necessary.

“The Chief Officer team has listened to concerns raised by officers as well as taking on board recent recommendations from the National Police Chief’s Council and have taken the decision that spit guards will be rolled out to all front line officers across the force, in line with 25 other police forces nationally.”

Dyfed-Powys Police and Crime Commissioner, Dafydd Llywelyn, said: “Dyfed-Powys Police officers do their utmost to deliver invaluable services to the public, day in day out, no matter the circumstances. It is not right that they are subject to abuse whilst performing their duties, and it is our duty to protect those who strive to keep us safe and free from harm.

“In March 2018 I wrote to Members of Parliament to encourage them to support the passage on Emergency Workers (Offences) Bill through the House of Commons. It is an important initiative which seeks to underline the importance of protecting emergency workers from assaults such as spitting and biting, and is a significant step in highlighting our mutual stance on this matter. It is of utmost importance that we take action to protect our police officers.”

College of Policing said: “Spit guards are for the protection of the arresting officer, other emergency service personnel and the public.

“It is recognised that the need to use spit guards or handcuffs during the restraint of an individual may cause distress to them and those who witness the arrest.

“However, as well as serving as protective equipment for the officer, it is also recognised that, by eliminating the risk of being spat on, bitten or the transmission of communicable diseases, the need for physical restraint may be reduced.

“As such, the risk of serious physical injury to the individual being arrested, is also reduced.

“The College has recently led a national review of the Personal Safety Training given to officers, which includes a section on spit guards and the medical implications of their use.

“As with all use of force, it will be for the arresting officer to justify their actions in each individual circumstance. The availability and use of equipment such as spit guards remain a local decision for each chief constable.”

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