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Carmarthen Bay Film Festival returns to Llanelli

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THERE’S just four weeks to go to the start of the prestigious Carmarthen Bay Film Festival in Llanelli.

The festival is now in its seventh year and continues to go from strength to strength.

A total of 699 entries were received for this year’s festival award categories, from film-makers worldwide.

The festival is being staged at Llanelli’s Stradey Park Hotel, from May 14-17.

All of the film-based events are free to the public.

“It is astonishing how the festival has grown in popularity from very small beginnings,” said Festival CEO and organiser Kelvin Guy.

“They say great things grow from little acorns and that is very true of the film festival.”

The Welsh fourth channel S4C will be sponsoring the awards dinner at this years’ festival.

“That just shows how much importance is being attached to the festival,” said Mr Guy.

“In recent years we’ve had added glitz and status as the event is on the approved list for BAFTA Cymru Wales.”

Mr Guy added: “The BAFTA abbreviation is pretty special in the world of film. The British Academy of Film and Television Arts is recognised as a hugely prestigious organisation worldwide. To get this recognition from BAFTA Cymru Wales is a huge honour and is a great achievement when you consider what the festival has achieved since it launched in 2011.

“Being on the list of approved BAFTA Cymru Wales festivals helps give added prestige and stardust to the festival, with entrants now being eligible for BAFTA awards as well as the ones on offer at the festival.”

Mr Guy added: “We hope the festival really catches the imagination of the public in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire and the rest of South Wales. It’s free. The only ‘pay’ part of the event is the awards dinner at the end.

“The festival will follow closely on the heels of the Celtic Media Festival at Ffwrnes Theatre, Llanelli, so it’s clear that Llanelli and Carmarthenshire is making headway in terms of being recognised for film, television and digital media.”

Entries for this year’s festival have come from all corners of the globe, including Syria, Hong Kong, China, Korea, Taiwan, Iran, Iraq, Israel and North and South America.

Mr Guy said: “The global response has been fantastic and I’d like to think that the festival is doing its best to put Llanelli and Carmarthenshire on the world map for film-makers.”

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Share experiences of sexual harassment to help police

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PEOPLE who have been subject to sexual harassment are encouraged to share their experiences to help understand the scale of the problem in communities across Wales.

Dyfed-Powys Police is taking part in a country-wide campaign, which urges anyone who has been subject to sexual harassment to say when and where the incident took place, as well as how it made them feel, anonymously through an online survey.

The results will be used to challenge and change the culture of misogyny and sexual harassment, so people can feel safe to live their lives without fear of harassment.

Dyfed-Powys Police Assistant Chief Constable Richard Lewis said: “Sexual harassment is simply unacceptable – it doesn’t matter who it comes from or where it happens, it should not be tolerated by anyone in society.

“We are committed to making sure everybody feels safe in their community, and has the freedom to make life choices without fear of sexual harassment. We want people to be able to access every area of society with confidence, from sports facilities and workplaces, to public transport or pubs and clubs.

“By taking part in this survey, you will help us to understand the scale of the problem in communities across Dyfed-Powys Police, which will enable us to listen to those affected by sexual harassment and to make a real difference in the future.”

To take part in the survey, visit https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/SWPCOM

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Proposed salmon byelaws to be postponed until 2019

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NEW fishing byelaws have been proposed which will make it mandatory for fishermen to release all salmon caught in Welsh rivers.

The procedures for introducing new byelaws are protracted and Natural Resources Wales wishes to avoid uncertainty for fishermen by delaying implementation of approved new measures until the 2019 fishing season.

The proposed all Wales byelaws, which include restrictions on fishing methods to help the survival of released fish and reduced net fishing seasons, are currently being considered by Welsh Government.

Dave Mee, Senior Fisheries Advisor for NRW, said: “At the moment timescales for a decision are uncertain, so we are proposing that introduction of any new measures should be postponed until the beginning of the 2019 rod and net seasons.

“We hope this will help clarify the situation for anglers, netsmen, fishery owners and clubs and associations.”

Welsh salmon stocks remain in a perilous condition. Although the mandatory catch and release proposals have proved unpopular with anglers, NRW firmly believes that they, along with other measures such as tackling agricultural pollution, improving water quality and managing the potential threats from predators are vital for the future survival of these iconic fish.

Peter Gough, Principal Fisheries Advisor for NRW added: “This delay is a pragmatic solution to resolving current uncertainty.

“However, it is important to note that this does not mean there will be further debate on the subject as NRW has concluded its position and the case for further controls has been made and presented to Welsh Government and it remains unchanged.

“Protection of the breeding resources of these wonderful fish is a fundamental part of our work to manage this important natural resource sustainably.”

This season, fishermen are again being asked by NRW to practice full restraint and ensure conservation of fish stocks by voluntarily releasing all the salmon they catch in 2018.

Dave explained: “Our salmon stocks are in serious trouble and have fallen to historically low levels and the same is true of about half of our sea trout stocks.

“Neither species can sustain uncontrolled killing of fish and so we are again asking all anglers to release all of their salmon.

“Most anglers are already voluntarily releasing the fish they catch, but some are not. We feel the situation is now so serious for salmon that we must ask all anglers to help preserve as many fish as possible by returning all their salmon.

“It’s also very important to take great care of returned fish. Fishing methods and tackle should be used that ensure fish have a high probability of survival, they should always be kept in the water while unhooking to ensure they can swim away strongly.”

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Don’t be a Bystander campaign launches

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Live fear free: From the Don't Be A Bystander film

A NEW campaign to show how important a positive intervention can be for someone experiencing or who has experienced violence against women, domestic abuse and sexual violence launches today in Wales with a powerful short film featuring the words of survivors.

Leader of the House and Chief Whip Julie James will meet survivors to talk about their experiences and how the actions of those people around them can make a difference.

Julie James said:

“We want to encourage everyone to act, to do something, however small or simple when they are worried that someone they know is, or may be experiencing violence, abuse or sexual violence.

“Just the very act of asking someone “are you ok?” can have a huge impact.

“We do not advocate stepping in and intervening in a potentially dangerous situation or where people could get hurt – please call the police in this situation.

“We want to create a culture where people feel empowered to help prevent violence against women, domestic abuse and sexual violence and to make Wales the safest place to be a woman.”

The campaign film encourages everyone to support someone they are worried about and signposts them to the Live Fear Free helpline and website. The campaign also includes a short film which explains what happens when you call the helpline as a concerned person.

Mary* is a survivor of domestic abuse; her colleagues had noticed her behaviour change and one sat her down to say “that’s one bruise too many”. Mary’s neighbours had suspicions and became involved when her daughter went to them for help.

They brought Mary into their home and she accepted their offer to ring the police. Only then did she realise that a number of her neighbours had suspected something was wrong. Her partner was arrested that night and her life changed.

Mary said:

“Suddenly I didn’t feel alone. People asked “are you ok?” and “how can we help?” and I felt that I could answer. I’m not sure I would have felt safe enough to answer before but hope that I would have at some point.

“I know I had been relieved when my colleague had asked, even though I didn’t feel able to speak to them about what was happening.

“What I would say to people who suspect things are not right with a family member, friend, colleague or neighbour, is trust your instinct, ask them if they’re ok and keep asking, it may not be the right time for them to speak to you when you ask that first time, but your words could be the glimmer of hope that leads to a life being saved.”

Sarah* grew up in Nigeria, where Female Genital Mutilation is common in her community. The traditional beliefs and practices were so instilled that it was something that every girl endured. Crucially, Sarah did not know that the practice was called FGM.

When her midwife asked her if she had been subjected to it, she said:

“I was confused and got upset and angry, it wasn’t what I was expecting, in our culture women who are not cut are seen as unclean. I tried to walk away and as I did I was asked by the receptionist, “are you ok?”. Thankfully she helped me to calm down as I realised that I wanted to talk to my midwife. Even though it must have been difficult for her too, she was understanding and helped me.”

She brought her daughter to Wales so that she would not be cut after she came to realise what had been done to her. She said:

“I wish the people who helped me could see the impact on mine and my family’s lives, I wish they could see the confidence they have given me. I would like them to see how happy I am day to day, my children are not going to go through this, I am a survivor.”

Find out how to support someone today to live fear free. Visit www.livefearfree.gov.wales or call 0808 8010800 for 24 hour confidential advice and support.

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