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St John Lloyd pupil tragically passes away

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POLICE have confirmed that a pupil of St John Lloyd School has tragically passed away this afternoon (Sept 12).

The family of the child have been informed and are being supported by specially trained officers.

Police are not treating the death as suspicious and stress that parents have no need to worry about their children at the school.

A Dyfed-Powys Police spokesperson said: “Dyfed-Powys Police is in attendance at St John Lloyd School in Llanelli after concerns were raised for the wellbeing of a pupil.

“Tragically, we can confirm that the child has passed away in hospital. His family has been informed and are being supported by specialist officers.

“The incident is not being treated as suspicious and there is no need for other parents to be concerned for the welfare of their children.

“Our thoughts are with the family and the school at this sad time.

“St John Lloyd is working with the local authority, the diocese and Dyfed-Powys Police in order to ensure pupils and staff are supported.”

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Jeremy Hywel

    September 13, 2018 at 7:06 am

    A personal reflection…

    SUICIDE DOESN’T KILL PEOPLE. SADNESS DOES.

    Earlier this week was World Suicide Prevention Day and probably passed with minimal awareness by most of us and most never even paid a glimpsing thought to the subject of suicide or even the more painful subject of child suicide.

    The tragedy of the saddest of news from St. John Lloyd School has sadly brought this unthinkable topic to front of mind.

    And the rise in child suicides is worrying. In the last 12 months, the number of children and teenagers who are taking their own lives has hit its highest rate in 14 years with more than four suicides a week. This summer has seen child suicides in London rise 107% in the last three years, four times the national rate. In many places around the world, suicide is the leading non-natural cause of death for children. All these statistics are growing.

    An unthinkable topic. A needless waste of young lives.

    The lives of children and young people these days have changed versus previous generations.
    The number of likes on Instagram and how many followers on social media define popularity. Traditional classroom arguments amongst a small pupil group traditionally may have cooled off overnight but today is fuelled by exponential public sharing and shaming via social media channels.
    Students’ academic life and college chances are determined by numbers, various scores and ranks. In the early 1960s, only 4% of school leavers went to university, rising to around 14% by the end of the 1970s. Nowadays, more than 40% of young people start undergraduate degrees – but it comes at a cost. Today’s students leave with debts of £40,000 and upwards to pay back over their working lives.

    When the current generation of parents was young, we had few worries about social media, cyber bullying, student loans, drug/alcohol abuse or violence in schools.

    All this adds pressures and painful strain on our young people. The very recent NHS state of health in England shows that mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression, along with substance abuse, now account for a third of all ill health.

    What can we do about it? On the macro level, the greater awareness of the problem and solutions must be driven. On a local and personal level, we can help as individuals. Don’t assume it’s a problem which won’t impact us. Today, a local family in our community, friends in our own schools, wake up to a nightmare which will never go away – the heart breaking tragedy of a teen suicide. And with suicides come the ever-circling vultures of guilt, blame, shame and the insanity of the words ‘what if…’.

    When suicidal thoughts are so common to all generations, how come society is so blind to the 6,600+ people who died of suicide in the UK alone each year? That’s twice the number of victims of the tragedy of the 9-11 Twin Towers?

    So, what can we do? Appreciate the added pressures facing our youngster in today’s society. Shame and spotlight the social media trolls and bullies. Extend a friendly hand to those who are lonely or disconnected. Speak up about those being bullied or experiencing abuse. Show support and care to those living with mental illness. Embrace those facing bereavement. Be a friend to those having low self-worth.

    Don’t cross the street to avoid these individuals nor turn a blind eye in the school corridors.

    No one, especially a child or a teen, should face the feeling of no hope or no purpose to life when life can be so beautiful. There are far, far better things ahead than what we leave behind.

    Jeremy Hywel

  2. Anna Ernsting

    September 13, 2018 at 12:14 pm

    Well said. I am disappointed the report says that parents at the school need not be concerned. The parents should be very concerned that bullying is taking place at their children’s school.I hope all steps are taken to identify the children concerned and their parents to ensure this is NEVER allowed to happen again. RIP Bradley. Thoughts are with ALL his family at this sad time.

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Drink driver was twice the limit

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A 46-YEAR-OLD man appeared before magistrates at Llanelli Law Court on Thursday (Nov 8) to face a charge of drink driving.

Matthew Francis of Gelli Deg, Llanelli, pleaded guilty to driving his Ford Focus in Llanelli on October 19, whilst over the drink drive limit.

Prosecutor, Sharon Anderson, said: “At 10.20pm police received a call from a member of the public. They were directed to his home address and found the vehicle of the driveway with Francis in the driver seat, and the keys in the ignition.

“He had driven back from a wedding and said he had 3-4 cans. He was arrested and later said he had 6-8 cans of lager and had placed the cans in the garden. Police checked the garden but there was nothing there.

“At half past midnight, Francis completed the intoxiliser and was found to have 70mg of alcohol in 100ml of breath. He was spoken to in an interview and said the van was his and nobody else was insured.”

Magistrates fined Francis £120 and ordered him to pay £30 victim surcharge and £85 prosecution costs. He was also disqualified from driving for 17 months.

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Police operation to get uninsured drivers off the road

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THIS week Dyfed-Powys Police along with other forces in England, Wales and Northern Ireland will be taking part in Operation Drive Insured, in a week of enhanced operations to remove uninsured drivers from UK roads and help protect road users.

Uninsured drivers are often involved in a wide range of criminal activities. Every year the Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB) Police Helpline records hundreds of incidents where an uninsured driver is found without a valid driving licence or using an untaxed or stolen vehicle. Records also show a number of offenders are caught driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Drivers without insurance are more dangerous than insured drivers and cause a high number of accidents. One contributing factor is because those driving with insurance are encouraged to display safer behaviour and meet road legal requirements to help keep policy costs down.

In 2017 MIB received 11,000 claims from victims of uninsured drivers, with hundreds of people who had suffered catastrophic, life-changing injuries.

MIB supports victims of uninsured and hit and run drivers by providing a last resort for claims and compensation. The annual cost to compensate victims of uninsured drivers comes to over £100 million and is funded by the motor insurance premiums of all law-abiding motorists.

Neil Drane, Head of Enforcement at MIB, said: “A driver with no valid insurance has no legal right to be on the road and removing them undoubtedly makes roads safer. The increased activity during Operation Drive Insured should get more of these drivers off our roads.”

Using data from the Motor Insurance Database (MID) – a central record of all UK motor insurance policies – police are using ANPR cameras to easily identify and stop motorists that appear to be uninsured. MIB’s police helpline supports roadside officers by investigating further and liaising with insurers to confirm whether there is valid insurance in place or not.

Any driver found without insurance during Operation Drive Insured is likely to have their vehicle seized, get six points on their licence, a £300 fine and could face court prosecution. Police also plan to carry out checks for a range of additional road traffic offences.

Simon Hills, Inspector for roads policing operations at Thames Valley Police, said: “In my experience, drivers who willingly use vehicles without insurance are often committing secondary offences. These range in seriousness from minor road traffic offences, to driving whilst disqualified and other crimes such as drug dealing and burglary. The effective enforcement of uninsured vehicles allows us to deny criminals the use of the road and prevent further offending. Operation Drive Insured is a perfect opportunity for us to target our resources.”

If a member of the public suspects a person is driving without insurance, they can report it to their local police force or anonymously to CrimeStoppers.

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Llanelli’s Schaeffler plant in Bynea seems to have been decided says Labour

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THE FATE of Llanelli’s Schaeffler plant in Bynea seems to have been decided, Llanelli’s local Labour representatives concluded after meeting the management of the German manufacturing firm in an early morning meeting in the town on Friday (Nov 9).

Llanelli MP Nia Griffith, Assembly Member Lee Waters and Bynea Councillor Deryk Cundy met with Senior Vice President Dr Thomas Cebulla and Greig Littlefair, Schaeffler’s UK managing director, to discuss this week’s announcement that 220 jobs were under threat at the old INA Bearings plant.

“Very concerningly, in spite of our entreaties, it seems that their minds are made up,” Nia Griffith MP said.

Ms Griffith added: “They stressed to us that the demand for the tappets being made in Llanelli has fallen, and is expected to drop drastically as the product comes to the end of its life and as demand for diesel engines reduces, and the new turbo charged product has not enjoyed the take up that had been hoped for.”

Lee Waters AM said: “The managers told us that Schaeffler is a very big global organisation with 72 factories worldwide and that the Llanelli closure is part of a global consolidation. They said it was no reflection on Llanelli workforce but a reaction to the change in demand for the product made in Bynea”

Deryk Cundy, the Councillor for the Bynea ward of Llanelli where the plant is based, said: “We told them that we will do all we can to work with the Welsh Government and Carmarthenshire Council to offer help if that would make a difference, but we were not encouraged by their response. It seems that their minds are made up.”

The Schaeffler executives stressed that Brexit was a consideration but not the decisive factor in this decision, pointing out that “we are a global business and global businesses want open borders and open trade”. They said Schaeffler had brought forward plans to consolidate their sites because of the uncertainty of the Brexit process.

Llanelli’s MP and AM have both called for the UK Government to prioritise giving business certainty in the Brexit negotiations.

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