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Tasha killed in ‘savage attack’

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screen-shot-2016-09-14-at-10-11-10JEALOUS and possessive Luke Jones “literally” beat Natasha Bradbury to death in her own home just hours after she confessed to sleeping with another man, a jury heard on Wednesday (Aug 31). 

Jones, aged 33, then waited until her body was “freezing cold” before calling for an ambulance to her flat in High Street, Haverfordwest.

Then, said Paul Lewis QC, prosecuting, he made up a story about her smashing up her own home in Imperial Court and falling over.

Jones, of Haven Drive, Milford Haven, denies murdering Miss Bradbury in the early hours of February 22 and is on trial at Swansea Crown Court.

Mr Lewis said Jones and Miss Bradbury, 27, had been in an “on off” relationship for three years.

In the days leading up to her death the relationship was under strain, he said, and text messages between them showed Jones was suffering emotionally.

Mr Lewis read to the jury dozens of messages that were “clearly personal and sent in the belief that no-one else would ever see them.”

“This is not like Facebook,” he added. “They are private messages between two people in a relationship.”

But they illustrated, alleged Mr Lewis, a man feeling jealous and possessive and willing to put emotional pressure on Miss Bradbury to keep their relationship going.

“It is for you (the jury) to assess. But we say that at times he expresses love, at others distress.”

On February 19 Jones, a pipe welder, told his supervisor he was unwell and made an emergency appointment with his doctor.

Jones told him he had “anger problems” and complained of losing his temper too easily and was referred to an anger management course.

“You might want to bear that in mind when considering the events that followed,“ Mr Lewis told the jury

Miss Bradbury spent the night of February 20 at the home of her friend Rhiannon Watts at Priory Road, Milford Haven, and Jones tried 26 times to contact her by telephone, including 13 attempts between 4am and 5am on the 21st.

Jones, said Mr Lewis, had already sent Miss Bradbury a text message reading, “I’m told you are seeing someone else.”

Mr Lewis said Miss Watts and Miss Bradbury had been joined that night by two brothers, Daniel and Darryl McGuckin. Miss Watts was in a relationship with Daniel and Miss Bradbury slept with his brother, Darryl.

The following morning, said Mr Lewis, Miss Watts told Jones what had happened and Miss Bradbury also contacted him to say, “Look, I’m sorry. I slept with someone last night.”

The following day Jones sent messages to friends, one of which read: “I can’t believe she’s done that. My Head’s in the shed but I’m passed caring. I loved her and gave her everything but what do I get.”

Jones later drove to Miss Bradbury’s home and between 8pm and 10pm she sent “sexual and flirtatious” messages with Darryl McGuckin.

“That takes us to ten pm,” said Mr Lewis. “What then?”

NEIGHBOURS HEARD LOUD NOISES 

Neighbours of Natasha Bradbury listened to more than two hours of “shouting, swearing and the noise of a flat being smashed up” the night she was allegedly beaten to death by her on-off boyfriend.

But they only ever heard the voice of a man, said Paul Lewis QC.

That man, it is alleged, was Luke George Jones

Mr Lewis said Lisa Smith, who also had a flat in Imperial Court, High Street, Haverfordwest, heard the noises from between 11.30pm and about 2am and thought Flat A, where Miss Bradbury lived, was being smashed up.

Another neighbour, Timothy Down, became so concerned he thought about calling the police but decided “not to get involved.”

“He could hear swearing and shouting. But he heard only a man’s voice,” added Mr Lewis.

The prosecution argue that Jones was in the process of beating Miss Bradbury to death, or had already done so.

Because at 2.48am Jones told a 999 operator that Miss Bradbury was already “freezing cold and her lips are blue.”

Mr Lewis played to the jury a recording of the 15 minute telephone call, which ended when a paramedic took the telephone from Jones and told the operator, “We could do with the police.”

It took Jones at least twelve attempts to explain to ambulance control where he was.

The operator instructed Jones on how to try and resuscitate Miss Bradbury by placing one hand on top of the other on her breast bone and pumping hard.

The operator could be heard telling Jones, “Pump hard. One, two, three, four. Again, one, two, three, four.”

The operator was interrupted by an ambulance crew who had arrived in Imperial Court but could not find “Flat A,” which was, in fact, a four storey high building.”

Then, a voice could be heard asking Jones, “How long has she been lying there.”

Jones replied, “For about an hour.”

The paramedic took the ‘phone from Jones and asked, “Is that ambulance control”

The operator told him that ambulance control had gone off the line.

Paramedic:“We could do with the police here.”

Operator:“Do you want me to put you through?”

Paramedic, “No, we are dealing with a patient.”

JONES REFUSED TO ANSWER POLICE QUESTIONS 

Luke Jones refused to answer questions from police investigating the “murder” of Natasha Bradbury at her flat in the centre of Haverfordwest.

And the prepared, written statements he later handed over were dismissed today as “nothing more than a pack of lies intended to avoid the consequences of what he had done to her.”

Paul Lewis QC told the jury that Jones “largely” answered none of the questions put to him by police.

But he later provided a number of prepared statements.

“He said he used no violence at all towards her and that she had suffered the injuries as a result of falling over,” added Mr Lewis.

“In essence, he appeared to be saying that her extensive injuries were accidental.

“If he maintains that account it will be for you to decide how it was she suffered the injuries that resulted in her death,” he told the jury.

“You will consider his intentions and his state of mind.”

Mr Lewis said the truth was that Jones had inflicted on Miss Bradbury a savage attack that had caused widespread and fatal injuries.

Miss Bradbury suffered extensive, blunt force injuries to her head, face and body. She suffered fractures to her neck and a wrist and there was evidence of injury to her brain.

Her heart had been bruised and there had been bleeding in the sack containing the heart.

There was also an “extensive” laceration to her liver that had led to massive bleeding into her stomach area.

“In a nutshell, he beat her to death in her own home,” added Mr Lewis.

NATASHA’S BLOOD STAINED FLAT 

The jury was provided with a pictorial walk through of the blood stained flat where Natasha Bradbury met her death.

The prosecution say she died after a savage attack by her on-off boyfriend, pipe welder Luke Jones.

Despite the address, said Paul Lewis QC, prosecuting, it was in fact a four storey high building.

As the photographs unfolded, blood stained items came into view.

There were blood stains on the door leading to her bedroom, and blood on the lip of the sink in her en-suite bathroom.

A bin had been overturned and the contents strewn around the bathroom. “You will hear more about that, about the contents, in due course,” Mr Lewis told the jury.

There were bloody hand marks on the banister of the stairs leading to the second floor kitchen, where “shattered crockery etc” could be seen.

There was blood on the kitchen walls, on a tissue lying on a work surface and in the kitchen sink.

There was also blood on a discarded cigarette end.

Mr Lewis said there was more blood on the banister of the stairs leading to the third floor, which contained the lounge where Miss Bradbury’s body was found.

In that room there was blood on the floor and a wall in addition to “widespread” damage.

A glass table had been smashed, as had a television, and there was glass around Miss Bradbury’s body.

A neighbour tried to record the sound of Natasha Bradbury being beaten to death, a jury heard today.

Timothy Down became so worried about the “loud, aggressive” noises coming from her flat that he hung his mobile telephone out of his bedroom window in an attempt to record them.

And then he made an electronic note on his mobile that read, “There seems to be some kind of domestic aggression coming from apartment A. Seems to be a male. The time is approximately 12.45am. Banging and shouting. Do I go across or call the police. I feel it is better to stay away.”

The prosecution at Swansea crown court say that, unknown to Mr Down, he had been listening to Miss Bradbury’s on-off boyfriend Luke George Jones beating her to death.

Mr Down, who lived in Flat D, said he was woken by the sound of “serious, heavy banging” coming from Flat A.

He said he heard a man say, “I f***ing loved you.”

A minute later he heard the same man say, “Now look what you have made me f***ing do.”

Paul Lewis QC, prosecuting, asked why he hadn’t telephoned the police.

Mr Down said he rang his father who advised him not to get involved.

The prosecution claim that Jones, a pipe welder, had been worried about his relationship with Miss Bradbury and just days before her death he had told his doctor that he had difficulty controlling his temper.

The night before she was killed Miss Bradbury had stayed with a friend, Rhiannon Watts, where she had had sex with Darryl McGuckin, the brother of Miss Watts’ boyfriend Daniel McGuckin.

Miss Watts told the jury she became “angry, very angry” because they had used the bed of one her children and the following morning she contacted Jones via Facebook to tell him Miss Bradbury had slept with another man.

Jones turned up at her home, she said, but looked to her to be more upset than angry.

Daniel McGuckin said he and his brother returned to Swansea, early on February 21. Later that evening he began to exchange “sexy” messages with Miss Bradbury, even though she had slept with his brother the night before.

The messages from Miss Bradbury stopped suddenly at 10.10pm.

“I thought it was a bit strange. I never heard from her again,” he said.

The prosecution claim that Jones killed Miss Bradbury a short while later, because at 2.48am he telephoned for an ambulance and told the operator she was already “freezing cold, her lips are blue.”

Miss Bradbury died from extensive blunt force injuries that included fractures to her neck and a wrist, bleeding in the sack containing her heart and massive bleeding from a cut to her liver.

The jury has heard that after his arrest Jones gave prepared statements to the police in which he said that Miss Bradbury had caused the injuries to herself by falling down.

Jones denies murder. The trial continues.

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Antisocial behaviour falls as police operation continues

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POLICE said that they saw a reduction in antisocial behaviour involving young people in Carmarthenshire over the weekend, following weeks of increased activity.

Dyfed-Powys Police officers proactively patrolled areas which have recently become hot spots for teenagers to gather and drink alcohol as part of an ongoing operation.

A police presence was also maintained on trains between Llanelli and Carmarthen to identify how many youngsters were travelling in the area and where they were getting off.

Sergeant Gemma Davies said: “Over the weekend we continued our work to target, deter and deal with antisocial behaviour and underage drinking in hot spots identified primarily in Llanelli and Burry Port.

“Section 34 dispersal orders had been put in place ahead of the weekend, meaning we could move on anyone likely to cause antisocial behaviour, but thankfully they were not required. This is an improvement on previous weekends when we have had to exercise these powers.

“A significant number of young people were spoken to, with the vast majority being pleasant, not under the influence of alcohol, and not causing any trouble.

“Members of the public acknowledged the high police presence, as did the young people, and this might have deterred underage drinking.

“We are very pleased to have seen the change in attitudes and behaviour this weekend.”

The force received just one call reporting youngsters gathering at Burry Port harbour, with no offences or antisocial behaviour identified by attending officers.

Of the young people spoken two over the weekend, two were found with alcohol which was seized. Follow-up antisocial behaviour letters will be issued, and home visits will take place shortly.

Groups were also reminded of the dangers of swimming near the harbour and were encouraged to take their rubbish home.

Officers on the rail network removed one drunk adult from a train.

Sgt Davies said: “I would like to thank all officers involved in the operation over the weekend, as well as the young people who made sure they stayed within the law while enjoying the weather.

“We will be out and about again next weekend and throughout the summer, making sure the area is enjoyable for all who visit.”

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Lord Lieutenant visits Mass Vaccination Centre

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Her Majesty’s Lord Lieutenant of Dyfed, Miss Sarah Edwards, has paid tribute to all those involved in the COVID-19 vaccination programme during a visit to the Y Ffwrness Mass Vaccination Centre in Llanelli.

During the visit on Wednesday 9th June she was joined by the Vice Lord-Lieutenant, Lt Col David Mathias, and the High Sheriff of Dyfed, Mr.Jonathan Gravell. They met and spoke to the centre’s vaccinators, NHS staff, security staff and volunteers.

To date, the collective efforts of mass vaccination centres, GP practices and community pharmacies in Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire, have resulted in the Hywel Dda University Health Board delivering over 431,850 vaccinations. This means 266,785 of the eligible population have now received a first vaccine, and 165,056 have received both doses.

The Lord-Lieutenant of Dyfed said: “It was wonderful to see first-hand the incredible work being undertaken by the vaccinators, NHS staff and volunteers. They have played a crucial role in the success of the vaccine rollout programme. I would also pay tribute to the public for their overwhelmingly positive response to getting vaccinated.”

Maria Battle, Chair of Hywel Dda University Health Board, added: “On behalf of the health board, I was delighted to welcome Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of Dyfed, Miss Sara Edwards, the Vice Lord-Lieutenant, Lt Col David Mathias, and the High Sheriff of Dyfed, Mr Jonathan Gravell. I am deeply proud of everyone involved in the vaccination programme and I’m glad they got to see for themselves the incredibly work being undertaken to help get us through this pandemic.”

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Alcohol seized and teenager arrested as police deal with antisocial behaviour

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POLICE seized large amounts of alcohol and arrested a teenager as they continued to deal with antisocial behaviour over the weekend.

Dyfed-Powys Police had proactive plans in place to deal with ongoing issues of groups of youngsters gathering in Carmarthenshire following rising reports of alcohol-related antisocial behaviour over the past two months.

Dispersal orders were in place across Llanelli and Burry Port, giving police the powers to move anyone believed to be causing a nuisance, harassment or distress out of the area.

Officers patrolling the rail network in Carmarthenshire on Saturday noticed a large amount of young people getting off the train at Ferryside, where an additional dispersal order was put in place and alcohol was seized.

Officers were also required to deal with children trespassing on the railway tracks.

Sergeant Gemma Davies said: “We had received reports of children with alcohol running across the tracks, which posed a huge danger to themselves and others, and had to be stopped as a priority.

“One boy who was detained became abusive towards officers and could not be reasoned with. Officers had no choice but to arrest him for his own safety and to prevent further offences from being committed.

“This incident goes to show that the kind of behaviour we are dealing with goes beyond groups of young people meeting to have a good time, and is putting people in highly dangerous situations.”

A 17-year-old boy was arrested on suspicion of trespassing on the railway and using threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour to cause harassment, alarm or distress.

He has been released under investigation pending further enquiries by British Transport Police.

Early intervention was taken in the Trostre area of Llanelli, where officers noticed groups of children meeting on Saturday.

Sgt Davies said: “More than 60 young people were moved on from both locations and a large amount of alcohol was seized.

“Out of these groups, four notices were issued to those causing the most trouble in the Trostre area which prevented them from returning, and each of these youngsters were taken home.

“This swift action was a deterrent to other young people who were planning on joining the groups and were still travelling to the area.”

“We will continue to put plans in place each weekend and over the summer holidays to deal with antisocial behaviour, using all powers available to us to put a stop to it.”

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