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Tasha killed in ‘savage attack’

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screen-shot-2016-09-14-at-10-11-10JEALOUS and possessive Luke Jones “literally” beat Natasha Bradbury to death in her own home just hours after she confessed to sleeping with another man, a jury heard on Wednesday (Aug 31). 

Jones, aged 33, then waited until her body was “freezing cold” before calling for an ambulance to her flat in High Street, Haverfordwest.

Then, said Paul Lewis QC, prosecuting, he made up a story about her smashing up her own home in Imperial Court and falling over.

Jones, of Haven Drive, Milford Haven, denies murdering Miss Bradbury in the early hours of February 22 and is on trial at Swansea Crown Court.

Mr Lewis said Jones and Miss Bradbury, 27, had been in an “on off” relationship for three years.

In the days leading up to her death the relationship was under strain, he said, and text messages between them showed Jones was suffering emotionally.

Mr Lewis read to the jury dozens of messages that were “clearly personal and sent in the belief that no-one else would ever see them.”

“This is not like Facebook,” he added. “They are private messages between two people in a relationship.”

But they illustrated, alleged Mr Lewis, a man feeling jealous and possessive and willing to put emotional pressure on Miss Bradbury to keep their relationship going.

“It is for you (the jury) to assess. But we say that at times he expresses love, at others distress.”

On February 19 Jones, a pipe welder, told his supervisor he was unwell and made an emergency appointment with his doctor.

Jones told him he had “anger problems” and complained of losing his temper too easily and was referred to an anger management course.

“You might want to bear that in mind when considering the events that followed,“ Mr Lewis told the jury

Miss Bradbury spent the night of February 20 at the home of her friend Rhiannon Watts at Priory Road, Milford Haven, and Jones tried 26 times to contact her by telephone, including 13 attempts between 4am and 5am on the 21st.

Jones, said Mr Lewis, had already sent Miss Bradbury a text message reading, “I’m told you are seeing someone else.”

Mr Lewis said Miss Watts and Miss Bradbury had been joined that night by two brothers, Daniel and Darryl McGuckin. Miss Watts was in a relationship with Daniel and Miss Bradbury slept with his brother, Darryl.

The following morning, said Mr Lewis, Miss Watts told Jones what had happened and Miss Bradbury also contacted him to say, “Look, I’m sorry. I slept with someone last night.”

The following day Jones sent messages to friends, one of which read: “I can’t believe she’s done that. My Head’s in the shed but I’m passed caring. I loved her and gave her everything but what do I get.”

Jones later drove to Miss Bradbury’s home and between 8pm and 10pm she sent “sexual and flirtatious” messages with Darryl McGuckin.

“That takes us to ten pm,” said Mr Lewis. “What then?”

NEIGHBOURS HEARD LOUD NOISES 

Neighbours of Natasha Bradbury listened to more than two hours of “shouting, swearing and the noise of a flat being smashed up” the night she was allegedly beaten to death by her on-off boyfriend.

But they only ever heard the voice of a man, said Paul Lewis QC.

That man, it is alleged, was Luke George Jones

Mr Lewis said Lisa Smith, who also had a flat in Imperial Court, High Street, Haverfordwest, heard the noises from between 11.30pm and about 2am and thought Flat A, where Miss Bradbury lived, was being smashed up.

Another neighbour, Timothy Down, became so concerned he thought about calling the police but decided “not to get involved.”

“He could hear swearing and shouting. But he heard only a man’s voice,” added Mr Lewis.

The prosecution argue that Jones was in the process of beating Miss Bradbury to death, or had already done so.

Because at 2.48am Jones told a 999 operator that Miss Bradbury was already “freezing cold and her lips are blue.”

Mr Lewis played to the jury a recording of the 15 minute telephone call, which ended when a paramedic took the telephone from Jones and told the operator, “We could do with the police.”

It took Jones at least twelve attempts to explain to ambulance control where he was.

The operator instructed Jones on how to try and resuscitate Miss Bradbury by placing one hand on top of the other on her breast bone and pumping hard.

The operator could be heard telling Jones, “Pump hard. One, two, three, four. Again, one, two, three, four.”

The operator was interrupted by an ambulance crew who had arrived in Imperial Court but could not find “Flat A,” which was, in fact, a four storey high building.”

Then, a voice could be heard asking Jones, “How long has she been lying there.”

Jones replied, “For about an hour.”

The paramedic took the ‘phone from Jones and asked, “Is that ambulance control”

The operator told him that ambulance control had gone off the line.

Paramedic:“We could do with the police here.”

Operator:“Do you want me to put you through?”

Paramedic, “No, we are dealing with a patient.”

JONES REFUSED TO ANSWER POLICE QUESTIONS 

Luke Jones refused to answer questions from police investigating the “murder” of Natasha Bradbury at her flat in the centre of Haverfordwest.

And the prepared, written statements he later handed over were dismissed today as “nothing more than a pack of lies intended to avoid the consequences of what he had done to her.”

Paul Lewis QC told the jury that Jones “largely” answered none of the questions put to him by police.

But he later provided a number of prepared statements.

“He said he used no violence at all towards her and that she had suffered the injuries as a result of falling over,” added Mr Lewis.

“In essence, he appeared to be saying that her extensive injuries were accidental.

“If he maintains that account it will be for you to decide how it was she suffered the injuries that resulted in her death,” he told the jury.

“You will consider his intentions and his state of mind.”

Mr Lewis said the truth was that Jones had inflicted on Miss Bradbury a savage attack that had caused widespread and fatal injuries.

Miss Bradbury suffered extensive, blunt force injuries to her head, face and body. She suffered fractures to her neck and a wrist and there was evidence of injury to her brain.

Her heart had been bruised and there had been bleeding in the sack containing the heart.

There was also an “extensive” laceration to her liver that had led to massive bleeding into her stomach area.

“In a nutshell, he beat her to death in her own home,” added Mr Lewis.

NATASHA’S BLOOD STAINED FLAT 

The jury was provided with a pictorial walk through of the blood stained flat where Natasha Bradbury met her death.

The prosecution say she died after a savage attack by her on-off boyfriend, pipe welder Luke Jones.

Despite the address, said Paul Lewis QC, prosecuting, it was in fact a four storey high building.

As the photographs unfolded, blood stained items came into view.

There were blood stains on the door leading to her bedroom, and blood on the lip of the sink in her en-suite bathroom.

A bin had been overturned and the contents strewn around the bathroom. “You will hear more about that, about the contents, in due course,” Mr Lewis told the jury.

There were bloody hand marks on the banister of the stairs leading to the second floor kitchen, where “shattered crockery etc” could be seen.

There was blood on the kitchen walls, on a tissue lying on a work surface and in the kitchen sink.

There was also blood on a discarded cigarette end.

Mr Lewis said there was more blood on the banister of the stairs leading to the third floor, which contained the lounge where Miss Bradbury’s body was found.

In that room there was blood on the floor and a wall in addition to “widespread” damage.

A glass table had been smashed, as had a television, and there was glass around Miss Bradbury’s body.

A neighbour tried to record the sound of Natasha Bradbury being beaten to death, a jury heard today.

Timothy Down became so worried about the “loud, aggressive” noises coming from her flat that he hung his mobile telephone out of his bedroom window in an attempt to record them.

And then he made an electronic note on his mobile that read, “There seems to be some kind of domestic aggression coming from apartment A. Seems to be a male. The time is approximately 12.45am. Banging and shouting. Do I go across or call the police. I feel it is better to stay away.”

The prosecution at Swansea crown court say that, unknown to Mr Down, he had been listening to Miss Bradbury’s on-off boyfriend Luke George Jones beating her to death.

Mr Down, who lived in Flat D, said he was woken by the sound of “serious, heavy banging” coming from Flat A.

He said he heard a man say, “I f***ing loved you.”

A minute later he heard the same man say, “Now look what you have made me f***ing do.”

Paul Lewis QC, prosecuting, asked why he hadn’t telephoned the police.

Mr Down said he rang his father who advised him not to get involved.

The prosecution claim that Jones, a pipe welder, had been worried about his relationship with Miss Bradbury and just days before her death he had told his doctor that he had difficulty controlling his temper.

The night before she was killed Miss Bradbury had stayed with a friend, Rhiannon Watts, where she had had sex with Darryl McGuckin, the brother of Miss Watts’ boyfriend Daniel McGuckin.

Miss Watts told the jury she became “angry, very angry” because they had used the bed of one her children and the following morning she contacted Jones via Facebook to tell him Miss Bradbury had slept with another man.

Jones turned up at her home, she said, but looked to her to be more upset than angry.

Daniel McGuckin said he and his brother returned to Swansea, early on February 21. Later that evening he began to exchange “sexy” messages with Miss Bradbury, even though she had slept with his brother the night before.

The messages from Miss Bradbury stopped suddenly at 10.10pm.

“I thought it was a bit strange. I never heard from her again,” he said.

The prosecution claim that Jones killed Miss Bradbury a short while later, because at 2.48am he telephoned for an ambulance and told the operator she was already “freezing cold, her lips are blue.”

Miss Bradbury died from extensive blunt force injuries that included fractures to her neck and a wrist, bleeding in the sack containing her heart and massive bleeding from a cut to her liver.

The jury has heard that after his arrest Jones gave prepared statements to the police in which he said that Miss Bradbury had caused the injuries to herself by falling down.

Jones denies murder. The trial continues.

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New ward extension opens at Werndale Hospital

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WERNDALE Hospital opens its £1millon ward extension, featuring a suite of new spacious patient en-suite rooms and additional light and airy ward space for new nurses’ stations, new technology and medical equipment, in pleasant and comfortable spaces. 

Werndale is part of Circle Health Group, the UK’s largest provider of private healthcare. The group is carrying out a £125 million redevelopment programme across its 50 hospitals in the UK.

Werndale has a strong history in the village of Bancyfelin, where is has been serving the local communities of Wales for over 32 years.

James Davies, Wales and Scarlets rugby player, from Bancyfelin, cut the ribbon to mark the official opening on Monday 1st August. His nickname “Cubby”, is reference to his brother’s nickname, “Fox”; this refers to the Fox & Hounds pub their parents ran in Bancyfelin, the village where they grew up. Staff and consultants were given the chance to view the new extension, with a small gathering to mark the occasion and celebrate all the hard work that has gone into this project over the last 12 months.

Jacky Jones, Executive Director of Werndale Hospital said: “The investment programme is an exciting opportunity to expand what we can offer to patients at Werndale. Our staff and consultants are delighted with this expansion which will allow us to meet the private healthcare needs of patients and families in Wales and will decrease waiting times which will positively impact the patient’s experience. Having the new patient rooms here increases our ward capacity by 20%, it is a great investment”.

Gaynor Llewellyn, Director of Clinical Services said: “At Werndale we are committed to continuous improvement of clinical facilities and services. We continually invest in the hospital so that we can offer our patients and consultants reassurance when they visit us for treatments”.

Werndale Hospital is seeing increased demand for its services across all specialities particularly orthopaedic surgery, ophthalmology, and general surgery. Nearly 4,000 patients had surgery at Werndale Hospital, Bancyfelin during 2021 and the new investment will enable ward capacity to be increased by 25 per cent.

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M4 closed westbound following lorry fire near Swansea

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A SECTION of the M4 near Swansea was shut on Monday (Aug 8) due to a vehicle fire.

The westbound section of the motorway, between junction 47 at Penllergaer and junction 48 at Hendy closed.

Emergency services were called to the scene, and there was queuing traffic in the area.

Traffic monitoring service Inrix reported: “M4 Westbound closed, queueing traffic due to vehicle fire between J47 A48 (Penllergaer / Swansea West Services) and J48 A4138 Pontardulais Road”

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Police appeal after Llanelli assault: victim required hospital treatment

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DYFED POWYS POLICE is investigating an assault which occurred on Regalia Terrace, Llanelli, Carmarthenshire at about 12.05am, Sunday 3rd July.

The victim required hospital treatment.

Officers have carried out all possible lines of enquiry, and are now appealing for help from the public.

They would like to identify the person in the CCTV image, who may have information that could help the investigation.

Anyone who knows who the person is, or if you believe you are pictured, contact Dyfed-Powys Police.

This can also be done either online at: https://bit.ly/DPPContactOnline, by emailing 101@dyfed-powys.police.uk or phoning 101.

If you are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech impaired text the non-emergency number on 07811 311 908.

Please quote reference DP-20220703-011

Alternatively, contact the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously by calling 0800 555111, or visiting crimestoppers-uk.org.

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