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Education

Betting on teaching and technology

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STUDENTS from the University of Wales Trinity Saint David have recently returned from the annual Bett Conference, which was held in ExCel in London last weekend.

The conference, which is hosted by the global organisation Bett (British Educational Training and Technology), was held over four days and gave students and teachers the opportunity to keep up to date with the latest innovations in education resources and technology.

Students from UWTSD’s Faculty of Education and Communities were given the opportunity to listen to talks on creativity, innovation and education from influential figures such as Heston Blumenthal, Tony Robinson and Grammy-award winning artist Imogen Heap. It also featured a keynote speech from the author and international advisor to the arts and education, Sir Ken Robinson, who gave UWTSD students a special mention.

Carys Richards is a Senior Lecturer on the BA Education course. She said: “The show introduced a whole host of new, innovative and exciting technologies that we can incorporate within our programmes in order to enhance teaching and learning and drive the digital competence agenda forward.”

Georgina Whitlow is in her third year studying BA Education with QTS. She attended the conference and said: “Bett 2017 offered an insight into the types of educational changes currently being made by awe-inspiring technology. The vast range of international exhibitors, be it those delving into the new world of virtual reality or those delivering information with regards to online assessments, meant there was something for everyone. A personal highlight of the day for many was listening to guest speakers such as Imogen Heap and her ground-breaking MiMu gloves, Heston Blumenthal’s take on how cooking can unleash creativity and, most notably, Sir Ken Robinson, who as always managed to leave the audience with a sense of great admiration and inspiration for the future of education. If there was one resounding message to take away from the day it would be to embrace the changes surrounding education and dare to be innovative.”

Chris Gibbs (3rd Year BA Education with QTS), who also attended the conference, said: “Attending the Bett Educational Conference was an eye-opening experience, the variety and quantity of teaching resources that are available was outstanding. The technology available ranged from virtual reality headsets and interactive projectors to complete education programmes that included tracking information and methods to communicate directly and individually with parents.

“The highlight of the day was attending the seminar by Sir Ken Robinson; his presentation was a wonderfully inspiring talk about how education requires us, teachers and students to be bold and creative when we are in the classroom. It was a privilege to listen to him discuss serious issues in a funny, simple and selfless way.”

Ms Richards added: “It was an inspirational keynote speech filled with all the elements we have grown accustomed to expect from Sir Ken – humour, compassion, wisdom, and a nagging anxiety over the future of education. Staff and students alike were struck by his candid view of the potential damage education systems can have on children’s futures. Rest assured we do have options and the capacity to change how things are, armed with knowledge and understanding all children can benefit from a wholesome curriculum that recognises the potential and uniqueness of each individual child.”

The trip was organised by Mathew Jones, who is BA Education Programme Lead.

He said: “We have been coming to BETT with students for many years as we have always placed an importance on being aware of the emerging technologies and software that are being developed within education. We feel that students need to be aware of how their pedagogy and teaching could be enhanced with these technologies and how that can enrich the learning for the pupils in their future classrooms”

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Education

£18m to support children and young people with additional learning needs

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NEW funding to support children and young people with Additional Learning Needs has been announced by Jeremy Miles, the Minister for Education and Welsh Language.

£18m will be made available to provide extra support for children and young people with ALN who’ve been affected by the pandemic and to help educational settings as learners move to the new ALN system from this month.

£10m of the funding will be used to support learners with ALN affected by the pandemic and to improve their wellbeing. During the pandemic, many disabled children and young people, including learners with ALN, continue to experience a negative impact on their mental health and difficulties accessing education.

The funding will add to existing support for ALN learners, such as intensive learning support and speech and language therapy. The funding can also be used to provide extra resources to target the impacts of the pandemic, such as mental health support and tailored support to help with attendance.

£8m will be allocated to schools, nurseries, local authorities and Pupil Referral Units to move learners from the old Special Educational Needs (SEN) system to the new ALN system, as the roll-out of the Additional Learning Needs Act continues.

The new ALN system, being rolled out over three years, will ensure children and young people with ALN are identified quickly and their needs are met. The Act makes provision for new individual development plans, designed to put the views of learners at the heart of the decision-making process, alongside those of their parents or carers.

Minister for Education and Welsh Language Jeremy Miles said:

“We are determined to deliver a fully inclusive education system in Wales – a system where additional needs are identified early and addressed quickly, and where all children and young people are supported to thrive in their education.

“Schools and nurseries are already doing a fantastic job of supporting their learners, but we know they need more resources to do this. That’s why I’m announcing this additional investment to support learners to overcome the effects of the pandemic and prevent the entrenchment of inequalities on their education, employment opportunities, their health and wellbeing.”

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Education

Over £100m of new funding will help make schools and colleges Covid-secure

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Schools and colleges to receive additional funding

SCHOOLS and colleges will receive £103 million in Welsh Government funding, as learners return for the January term.

£50m will be provided via local authorities through the Sustainable Communities for Learning programme. The funding will help schools carry out capital repair and improvement work, with a focus on health and safety measures, such as improving ventilation. The funding will also be used to support decarbonisation.

£45m of revenue funding will also help support school budgets, assisting schools as they continue to deal with the ongoing impacts of the pandemic and to prepare for the requirements of the new curriculum.

An additional £8m will be provided to further education colleges, to ensure learning can continue safely and ensure the most disadvantaged learners are not further impacted by the pandemic.

Jeremy Miles, the Minister for Education and the Welsh Language, said:

“I know schools and colleges have faced a very difficult time and everyone across the workforce has worked incredibly hard to meet the challenges of the pandemic. This funding will further support our schools and colleges to keep settings as Covid-secure as possible.

“While we want to support the sector in recovering from the pandemic, we also have to make sure we continue to plan for the future, and help all education settings across Wales fulfil our collective goals of making Wales a net-zero nation.

“The funding announced today will help us to ensure sustainability across the sector – be that the environmental sustainability achieved through decarbonisation, or sustainability in provision.”

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Education

Welsh schools plan to work from home after Christmas

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Jeremy Miles MS

SCHOOLS across Wales have been told by the Education Minister to prepare for at-home learning starting in January. 

Jeremy Miles MS has repeated the Welsh Government’s aspiration to stick to in-person learning in schools. However, he added that some measures may need to be taken to protect children and staff members. 

He has written to schools, suggesting they have preparations in place to move to remote learning if needed. 

Schools will be given two days at the start of the spring term to create plans for all children to return to school. 

Colleges have also been given the option to use the two “planning days” at the start of term, and have been advised they can move to some online learning from January.

The use of face coverings in schools will continue, as well as an increase in taking Lateral Flow Tests. Secondary school pupils and staff are expected to test at least three times a week. 

Schools have also been given permission to stagger starting and finishing times in the new term to help combat the spread of the Omicron variant.

Mr Miles has said: “Our collective priority continues to be to minimise the disruption to education, and ensure where possible learners continue to receive in-person learning, as well as protecting staff, learners and communities,

“I know that the autumn term has been particularly challenging for school staff, learners and their families, and the level of disruption due to staff capacity has resulted in some schools having to make the difficult decision to move certain classes or year groups to remote learning for short periods.

“In recognition of the challenges that schools and colleges have faced, and the current levels of uncertainty regarding the impact of Omicron, I have today written to all schools and colleges to provide as much clarity now as I can to enable them to plan and prepare for the return in January.

“I am providing all schools with two planning days at the start of the spring term. This will  allow time for schools to assess staffing capacity and put the necessary measures in place to support the return of all learners.

“Schools will be asked to make use of the planning days to ensure they have robust plans in place to move to remote learning if required – this could be for individual classes or year groups or possibly for the whole school.

“Schools will be asked also to use this opportunity to revisit contingency plans, ensuring exam years are prioritised for on-site provision should there be a need to restrict in person learning at any time and consider what arrangements might need to be in place for vulnerable learners and the children of critical workers during any periods of disruption.

“This is a fast evolving situation and we continue to monitor the latest data and evidence.

“I would like to reiterate my thanks to all in the education community for all they have done during these most challenging of times.”

Commenting Laura Anne Jones MS, Welsh Conservative and Shadow Education Minister, said:

“The youngest in our society have sacrificed so much during the pandemic to protect others at a huge cost to their own life chances.

“Therefore, it is essential we do everything we can to ensure schools are kept open at their normal capacity.

“Education is not expendable, especially for vulnerable children where their time away from home is their only respite from abuse.

“There are legitimate concerns over workforce availability if a significant wave hits the country, and that’s why the priority and energy of government must be directed at rolling out the booster jab programme as quickly as possible.”

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