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Llanelli has now become a “thriving market for drugs” court hears

Thomas Sinclair

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LLANELLI has now become a “thriving market for drugs” due to a surge in “county lines” gangs, Swansea Crown Court heard last week.
Locals are being targeted by gangs from Birmingham and Liverpool selling Class A drugs such as crack and heroin.

Organised crime groups have been sending dealers – often youngsters with no criminal records to avoid suspicion to Carmarthenshire to set up shop.

The details emerged at the sentencing of a teenager last week who was sent to Llanelli to sell crack cocaine by a criminal gang.
Cameron Davy, 18, of Duncumb Road, Sutton Coldfield near Birmingham was found in a block of flats at Clos Dewi Medi in Morfa, Llanelli with 29 wraps of the class A drug and £1,132 in cash on 10 January.

Swansea Crown Court heard that police knew the teenager was from the Midlands and believed he may have been linked to a ‘county lines’ operation.

Jim Davis, prosecuting, told the court that when police were able to analyse the defendant’s phone they found numerous texts relating to drug deals over the preceding weeks and messages that showed he had regular contact with a criminal drugs gang known to police as “The Marco Line.”

Davy pleaded guilty to possession of crack cocaine with intent to supply and to possessing criminal property. The court heard he had no previous convictions.

Kate Williams, for Davy, said her client’s dealing had lasted a “couple of weeks” and he had been due to be paid £300 for his trip to Llanelli.

She said the defendant was very much at the bottom of the chain of command of the gang and had declined to name those who had sent him to west Wales. The barrister said when Davy’s mother had received the phone call to say her son was in custody she had no idea where Llanelli was, let alone why he was there.
Williams added that gangs tended to use people with no previous convictions to do their work because they were less likely to come to the attention of police.

Recorder Simon Mills told Davy custody was inevitable for those who dealt in Class A drugs.
Giving the defendant a one-third discount for his guilty pleas he sentenced the teenager to two years four months for the drugs charge, and to eight months for the money laundering charge – the sentences will run concurrently making an overall sentence of two years and four months in youth detention.

Davy will serve half that sentence in custody before being released on licence to serve the remainder in the community.

The judge said the defendant would still be 19 when he was released from the custodial element of the sentence and he then faced a stark choice.
He told the defendant he would still be “a young man with your whole life ahead of you” and could either stay involved in drugs – becoming “a broken addict looking old beyond your years” or a “hardened thug in a gang facing prison sentences in double figures” – or he could turn his back on that lifestyle and lead a “decent life”.

As he sent him down, Recorder Mills added: “I urge him to think about that moment his mother got the phone call from him.”

Speaking after the sentencing Dyfed-Powys Police detective inspector Andrew Griffiths told The Llanelli Herald that tackling the trade in drugs was a priority for the force.
He said: “Illegal drugs cause misery and they need to be taken off the streets.
“Tackling the issue is a top priority, and I encourage anyone with any information or concerns about drug misuse to contact us. As the sentencing of Cameron Davy shows, we will take action.”

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Uncategorised

Glimpse of exciting leisure centre planned for Llanelli

Carli Newell

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A GLIMPSE of the exciting new leisure centre planned for Llanelli has been released following Carmarthenshire County Council’s commitment of funding in its ambitious capital investment programme.

Designs for the £27million leisure centre, which will form part of the multi-million Pentre Awel health and wellbeing development in Machynys, include a 25-metre eight-lane swimming pool, an eight-court sports hall and an adventure play area for young children.

As well as offering traditional lane swimming and learn to swim classes, the pool hall will include innovative water-based slides, inflatables and wet assault courses to provide fun and stimulating activities for people of all ages and abilities.

The sports hall will provide top-class facilities for a range of indoor sports, including netball competition standard courts, alongside a cutting-edge gym.

There will also be a dedicated adventure play area with ‘soft play’ equipment for younger children including slides and climbing frames.

The specification for the designs for the wet and dry leisure areas follows extensive community engagement, including the thoughts and wishes of local school children following a public exhibition.

Leader of the Council, Cllr Emlyn Dole, said: “We are excited and absolutely committed to providing a brand new leisure centre for Llanelli as part of the landmark Pentre Awel development which will provide social, economic and health benefits for the whole of Carmarthenshire. This forms an exciting element of our overall investment in capital projects to improve and raise the aspirations of the county.

“Whilst Pentre Awel is primarily a development to support the health and wellbeing of our communities, we of course want to ensure people can visit and enjoy this fantastic location for leisure too.

“Taking feedback and inspiration from local people, our designs include an exciting and flexible range of activity facilities suitable for all ages and abilities.

“We’ve no doubt that this new development will make a huge difference to the lives future generations in Llanelli and the surrounding area, and we look forward to seeing things progress in the near future.”

Cllr Peter Hughes Griffiths, Executive Board Member for Culture, Sport and Tourism, said: “We have promised a new leisure centre for Llanelli and we’re looking forward to delivering on that. We’ve got exciting plans for a facility that will suit people of all ages and abilities.”

The Pentre Awel scheme proposed for an 83-acre site on Llanelli’s coastline will be the first development of its scope and size in Wales.

It is due to be part-funded by the £1.3 billion Swansea Bay City Deal, with a total of £40million being sought for the project.

Already approved by the City Deal’s Joint Committee and Carmarthenshire County Council, the business case is now with Welsh and UK Governments with a decision expected imminently.

The scheme will provide public, academic, business and health facilities all on one site to boost employment, education, leisure provision, health research and delivery, and skills and training.

The project is planned to include integrated care and physical rehabilitation facilities to enable the testing and piloting of life science technologies aimed at enhancing independent and assisted living.

A skills centre will focus on health and care training, along with a clinical delivery centre to deliver multi-disciplinary care closer to home.

Assisted living accommodation will also feature, along with a nursing home, a hotel, expansion space for businesses, and elements of both open market and social and affordable housing.

Worth millions of pounds to the local economy, Pentre Awel will also create a wide range of employment opportunities across the Swansea Bay City Region as whole.

Pentre Awel is being delivered by Carmarthenshire County Council in partnership with Hywel Dda University Health Board, Universities and Colleges.

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Cymraeg

Dynes mwyaf dylanwadol datganoli’n cael sgwrs dan y lloer

Thomas Sinclair

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UN o ferched mwyaf dylanwadol yn hanes datganoli Cymru fydd gwestai Elin Fflur ym mhennod nesaf Sgwrs Dan y Lloer nos Lun 15 Mawrth.

Wrth i’r haul fachlud ar arfordir Ceredigion, Llywydd y Senedd, Elin Jones bydd yn croesawu Elin i’w gardd yn Aberaeron. O flaen tanllwyth o dân, cawn glywed am ei phlentyndod yn ardal Llanwnen, ger Llanbed, ei dyddiau yn cyd-ganu yn rhan o grŵp Cwlwm, a’r hyn sy’n tanio ei gwleidyddiaeth.

Bu’r tân yn ei bol am gyfiawnder yno ers yn ifanc, er nad oedd gwleidyddiaeth yn beth amlwg ar yr aelwyd adref:

“Ges i ddim fy magu ar aelwyd wleidyddol lle’r oedden ni’n trafod gwleidyddiaeth. Bydden i ddim yn gwybod sut o’dd fy rhieni i’n pleidleisio pan o’n i’n ifanc. Ond dwi’n gwybod am stori o’dd un o’n athrawon i’n dweud. Yn yr Ysgol Gynradd, fi o’dd yr un disgybl bach hynny oedd yn cwyno wrth yr athrawon bod nhw’n cael peaches and cream i bwdin amser cinio, a bod y plant yn cael semolina…a bod hynny ddim yn deg.

“Ac felly mae’r athrawes hynny wedi dweud wrtha i sawl tro ers hynny bod rhywbeth yndda i hyd yn oed bryd hynny oedd yn gweld annhegwch ac yn gwrthod cymryd hynny!”

A buan y tyfodd yr awydd i wneud gwahaniaeth. Daeth y blas cyntaf o wleidyddiaeth ynghlwm â phlaid ddigon annisgwyl:

“Un o’r etholiadau cynta’ nes i sefyll oedd yn Ysgol Uwchradd Llanbed yn 1982 – un o’r etholiadau ffug ‘na, a dwi’n cael lot o dynnu coes am hyn – ond fi oedd yr ymgeisydd Torïaidd. 15 oed o’n i; o’n i ddim wedi ffurfio ‘ngwleidyddiaeth yn llawn yn fy meddwl! Ac yn rhyfedd iawn nes i ennill yr etholiad ‘na. Ond dwi wastad yn dweud mai teamwork oedd e, achos Shân Cothi oedd fy asiant! Dyna’r tro diwetha’ i mi sefyll i’r Torïaid…nes i ddysgu o hynna ‘mlân.”

Bu Elin ar Gyngor Tref Aberystwyth o 1992 tan 1999, a hi oedd Maer ieuengaf y dref yn nhymor 1997-98. Ond daeth holl ffurfioldeb y rôl yn dipyn o sioc iddi:

“Do’n i ddim wedi dishgwyl yr holl rigmarôl o’dd yn dod gyda bod yn Faer. Ac wrth gwrs gwisgo’r tsiaen; mae tsiaen Maer wedi cael ei wneud ar gyfer ysgwyddau llydan dyn o’r ddeunawfed ganrif fwy neu lai, felly pan mae menyw ifanc, eiddil yn dod i geisio’i gwisgo, dyw e ddim yn ffito; mae’n slipo, ac felly dyw gwisgo’r tsiaen ddim yn un o’r pethau mwya’ cyfforddus yn gorfforol na sut o’dd o’n cael ei weld.

“Dwi’n meddwl bod angen i bobl – bobl ifanc a menywod yn enwedig i gymryd cyfrifoldebau gwahanol a rhoi eu henwau mlân, achos mae ‘na ormod o ddynion mewn gwleidyddiaeth wedi bod ar hyd y ganrif ddiwetha’.

“I fi, o’dd cerdded mewn i stafelloedd cyfarfodydd yn y 90au pu’n o’dd hwnna gyda ‘ngwaith i gyda’r Bwrdd Datblygu bryd hynny neu yn fy ngwleidyddiaeth i o fewn Plaid Cymru, yn y Cyngor Tref yn Aber, roedd yn ddynion mewn siwts llwyd i gyd, ac felly o’dd menyw’n cerdded mewn cot binc tamed bach yn wahanol, ac mae’n bwysig dod a ‘bach o liw i wleidyddiaeth.

“Pobl wahanol o gefndiroedd gwahanol, ac fe ddylai pob agwedd o fywyd fod yn hanner menywod, hanner dynion, achos dyna beth yw bywyd, ac felly mae’n bwysig fod menywod yn cymryd y cyfrifoldebau yna.”

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Farming

Funding for agri-plastics research

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THE USE of plastics in agriculture has improved food production and food security in many countries. It has also left a legacy of plastic pollution on agricultural land.

A new multinational research project working with five low and middle-income countries (LMICs) and funded by the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council will search for ways to resolve the plastic pollution caused by adopting plastics as cheap and readily available mulch layers, and for other uses.

It will have the dual focus of addressing current problems and setting up legacies to enable future generations to engage with the situation.

The UK Research & Innovation Award sees three Bangor University experts, Professors Davey Jones Dave Chadwick and Peter Golyshin of the University’s School of Natural Resources working with research groups from the Universities of Bristol and Reading in the UK, and soil scientists, socio-economic researchers, advisor and farmer networks, agri-industries and regional governments in China, Egypt, India, Sri Lanka and Vietnam.

The five countries selected are at differing points in tackling their acute problems with agricultural plastics.

Together, these countries use 3 million tonnes of agricultural plastic film each year, covering 25 million hectares of agricultural land. They also span a wide range of climates and possess different governance structures.

As well as quantifying the risks posed by the plastics currently in the soil, the teams at each location will co-design practical, economic, socially acceptable and politically viable solutions specific to the needs and problems of their country to reduce plastic legacy.

The focus for Davey Jones, Professor of Soil Science is to investigate the impacts that conventional macro, micro and nano-plastics that are degrading within soils pose to the long-term health of agricultural ecosystems.

He said: “These plastics have wrought significant improvements. The use of plastic mulch films, in particular, has transformed the livelihoods of millions of smallholder farmers across the world. The use of plastic for such purposes should continue, alongside the continued development of sustainable agriculture.

“But the fate and disposal of plastics have never been properly addressed. We need to know what impact these widely used materials are having on the environment and on human health.”

Dave Chadwick, Professor of Sustainable Land Use Systems, said: “Plastic pollution is identified by the UN Environmental Programme as one of the top 10 global environmental problems and is hampering achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.
“Most of the ocean’s plastic originates from the land- and terrestrial plastic may be a larger problem than we realise.

“We want to work in partnership and co-deliver viable solutions to help remediate lands contaminated with plastic. We also want to ensure that the projects have a legacy so that tools, technology and partnerships which develop persist beyond the end of the project, and can be shared with others.”

Professor Sir Duncan Wingham, Executive Director of the Natural Environment Research Council, said: “Pollution caused by plastic waste is one of the world’s biggest environmental challenges, and UKRI is at the forefront of funding research to find solutions.

“These awards totalling £20 million are a vital step in helping world-leading researchers develop realistic and feasible solutions to reduce plastic pollution while enabling equitable, sustainable growth.

“Our investment in international development research aims to positively impact the lives of millions of people across the world and supports global efforts to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.”

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