Connect with us
Advertisement
Advertisement

Health

Health Board takes actions to protect healthcare for the most critically ill

Published

on

HEALTH and care services across West Wales are responding to the impacts of the Omicron variant of COVID-19 in order to provide emergency and urgent care for patients in the safest way possible during the coming weeks.

Hywel Dda University Health Board is taking a number of actions today, and appealing for the continued support of our staff and communities to keep Hywel Dda safe as we face this new phase of the pandemic.

Actions are being taken in a planned way due to the high demand we are seeing for non-COVID care during this time of the year, together with high incidence of COVID-19 in our area, like the rest of the UK.

This is starting to result in higher numbers of COVID admissions and incidences in our hospitals and communities.  

It is also having a direct impact on our staffing levels across primary care, community and hospital services.  We currently estimate that at least 10 per cent of our workforce is absent for both COVID and non-COVID related reasons.  This figure is higher in some teams and we expect it to rise in the coming weeks. We need to plan how we deliver the most critical clinical services with the staff we have available. 

Actions being taken include:

  • The health board is providing and reminding staff of the services available to them internally to support them at this difficult time. It is standing down some less urgent work in order to redeploy staff where possible.
  • To maintain delivery of the most urgent cancer surgery in the short term, this will be undertaken for the Hywel Dda population from Prince Philip Hospital, in Llanelli, with the exception of Head and Neck urgent cancer surgery, which will continue at Glangwili General Hospital, in Carmarthen.. Our clinicians believe that concentrating the majority of our urgent care resources onto one site during the next few weeks is the best way to protect the delivery of this potentially life-saving surgery. This position will be continually reviewed and we will seek to re-establish urgent cancer surgery at our other main hospitals as soon as we can do so safely. We ask patients and families to support us and travel for their surgery. If you have no means to travel for your surgery, then please contact us on our COVID enquiries line on  0300 303 8322 or email COVIDEnquiries.hdd@wales.nhs.uk 
  • Outpatient & therapy appointments and clinics will be prioritised for the most urgent patients over the next few weeks. With the exception of a small number of emergency cases and some children’s appointments, we will reschedule outpatient appointments next week.  Patients will be re-booked according to clinical urgency in subsequent weeks. Unless you are contacted directly by the health board, please attend any appointment as scheduled. If anyone has concerns about the delay in their outpatient appointment, as a result of this short term measure, they can contact the health board on 0300 303 8322 or email COVIDEnquiries.hdd@wales.nhs.uk 

Director of Operations Andrew Carruthers said: “The whole of the UK is facing challenge from Omicron and the indirect impact on staffing. This is affecting us in Hywel Dda UHB across all our services whether in the community, primary care or hospitals, but to different degrees and is a very fluid situation. To ensure the delivery of care for the most critically unwell, and to ensure we protect the ability of our staff to provide this care, we have put in place actions that will provide some extra capacity. We apologise to anyone affected adversely by these actions and it remains our ambition, always, to re-establish our planned care services as soon as we are able to, knowing the impact this has on people’s lives.”

Director of Nursing, Quality and Patient Experience Mandy Rayani added: “We are so grateful to our staff who continue to work in difficult circumstances, always driven by the desire to provide the best care possible to our population. We are asking our staff to be vigilant about the behaviours we know reduce transmission of COVID-19 at work and at home; and our public can also play a significant role in supporting the NHS and each other by also adhering to these principles. Unfortunately we are seeing more abuse targeted at our staff and we will not tolerate this. Health and care staff – from the clinicians to the support teams and call handlers in primary, community and hospital teams – provide a service to help our patients and communities and they should never be the victims of abuse, physical or verbal. Please help us to help you.”

Steps you can take to protect more lives, our NHS and each other include:

  • Get your full course of vaccination https://hduhb.nhs.wales/healthcare/covid-19-information/covid-19-vaccination-programme/
  • Follow Welsh Government guidance on self-isolation and testing, including carrying out regular LFDs (health and care staff have specific and different guidance internally)
  • Wear face coverings, or if asked in a health setting, a surgical face mask
  • Keep a 2meter distance from others when you can
  • Wash hands regularly and be ready to be asked by a healthcare professional to wash hands or sanitise whether in hospital or your own home
  • Do not accompany people to hospital, GP surgery, or another setting unless they are vulnerable and need your assistance
  • Please be aware that your GP surgery may offer you appointments in different ways where appropriate, such as over the telephone or online. Please allow extra time when ordering prescriptions during this busy time. Community pharmacies are also extremely busy so you may need to wait longer than usual.
  • Pre-arrange hospital visiting with the ward sister and be understanding if it is not possible at this time due to safety

The health board continues to work closely with others including the Welsh Ambulance Service NHS Trust, local authorities and other partners to work together in these challenging times.

If you or a loved one is unwell, remember:

If you have a relative or loved one in hospital who is medically fit but is waiting to be discharged, you may be able to help us by providing short term care or considering interim placements in care homes.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Health

Give blood, save lives – Do something memorable this National Blood Donor Week

Published

on

THE WELSH BLOOD SERVICE is urging people to consider becoming blood donors to help save lives this National Blood Donor Week.

Over 350 blood donations are needed every day across Wales. The donations play a vital role in saving lives by supporting a range of treatments, from helping recovering accident victims and patients with blood cancers to supporting mothers and newborn babies during childbirth. 

The Welsh Blood Service supports 20 hospitals across the country and relies on donations from blood, platelet and bone marrow donors to help patients in need.

Supporting the call is 65-year-old Howard Provis, one of Wales’ longest serving donors with nearly 50 years of dedication to the service. Howard has been donating platelets since the age of 18 and has recently made his 1,000 th donation which has helped save the lives of thousands of people across Wales.

Encouraging more people to come forward following his own experience, Howard explains, “With a background in first aid and first responding, I have seen people in many situations that have required blood. For me being able to give blood or platelets has given some of those people a second chance to live or spend precious extra time with their families and friends.

“Tomorrow, it could be me that needs a blood or platelet donation, or my wife, family or a friend. The thought that my donation today could potentially save someone’s life tomorrow has inspired me to keep supporting the Welsh Blood Service.”

Speaking of Howard’s achievement Alan Prosser, Director of the Welsh Blood Service explains, “Howard is one of only a handful of donors to reach this incredible milestone, and his donations will have helped patients in need from hospitals across the whole of Wales.

“His commitment to helping others is truly inspirational, and we hope his story encourages others to start their own lifesaving journey this National Blood Donor Week.”

National Blood Donor Week is an opportunity for blood services across the UK to raise awareness of the lifesaving importance of blood donation and encourage those who have never donated to give it a go.

The week also incorporates World Blood Donor Day (June 14), a day of celebration and thanks to the thousands of people who give up their time freely to donate and help people in need.

Alan continues, “We must say a huge thank you to every single donor who has supported us over the past two years. It has been a challenging period, but the generosity of people across Wales has been unwavering.

“As our Service works towards a post-covid collection service, we hope more people will step forward and join our lifesaving team. Following changes to UK donation guidelines, more people than ever before can safely donate, which means there has never been a better time to give it a go.”

June 14 is also the one-year anniversary of the landmark changes introduced following the recommendations made by the FAIR (For the Assessment of Individualised Risk) steering group.

These pioneering changes to donation rules have meant that all donors, regardless of gender, are now asked a set of questions, meaning that more people than ever before, including those from the LGBTQ+ community are potentially eligible to donate.

You can book your first or next blood donation appointment by visiting www.wbs.wales/nbdw22 and if you are 17-30, you can also consider signing up to the Welsh Bone Marrow Donor Registry.

For those who cannot donate, you can still become a Welsh Blood Service supporter. 

Sharing their social media posts, encouraging your friends, family and colleagues to raise awareness of the importance of donating blood, platelets and bone marrow.

To learn more about donating blood, platelets and bone marrow, or to book, visit www.welshblood.org.uk.

Continue Reading

Health

Welsh residents unaware of the early signs of dehydration according to new resarch

Published

on

PEOPLE living in Wales are unaware of the five most common signs of dehydration, according to research from Aqua Pura.

Even though more than half (55%) of residents believe they know the symptoms of dehydration, the new research reveals many don’t know the early warning signs.

More than two thirds (65%) don’t think having bad breath/a dry mouth is a symptom of dehydration, while half (50%) don’t think dark coloured urine is a tell tail sign. In reality, both are early warning signs which shouldn’t be ignored.

Early signs which residents in Wales don’t think are signs of dehydration (but actually are) include (% of survey sample):

·       Bad breath/dry mouth (65%)

·       Feeling dizzy (53%)

·       Dark coloured urine (50%)

·       Fatigue (48%)

·       Headache (42%)

“Dehydration can lead to a number of health problems such as constipation, muscle tiredness, urinary tract infections and headaches, so it’s concerning to see that so many people are unaware of the early signs. It’s known that having a good level of hydration can help to maintain higher energy levels, better weight control and faster thinking.

“As we approach the summer months and temperatures across the country rise, it’s important that people take the time to drink more to keep their fluid levels topped up and avoid any unwanted health issues. This fluid can in fact come from a variety of drinks and foods, but plain water is a great calorie and sugar free option to ensure you stay hydrated,” comments hydration expert, Dr Stuart Galloway of the University of Stirling.

From fizzy drinks and fresh orange juice, to tea and coffee the research reveals residents of Wales are unaware that drinks other than plain water can contribute to hydration levels.

In fact, almost two fifths (17%) of those surveyed don’t think that sparkling water contributes, let alone fizzy drinks.

Top 10 drinks residents of the Wales don’t think help with hydration

1.     Wine (68%)

2.     Beer/larger (66%)

3.     Cider (64%)

4.     Coffee (53%)  

5.     Hot chocolate (47%)

6.     Fizzy drinks (44%)

7.     Fresh juice (21%)

8.     Tea (25%)

9.     Sparkling water (17%)

10.  Dilutable juice (13%)

“Many will be surprised to see drinks like wine and coffee on the list, as they’re often thought to dehydrate you. Alcoholic drinks will lead to dehydration, but only if you drink more than one or two servings. A similar situation occurs with caffeinated drinks, for example, a black coffee is mostly boiling water so this makes up part of your daily water intake. The dehydration effect of caffeine starts to kick in after around a litre of regular coffee, up until then it can be classed as part of your daily intake of water. However, often the best and healthiest way to ensure you’re getting your daily intake of water is by drinking plain still or sparkling water,” adds Dr Stuart.

Even though drinking water is the easiest, and healthiest, way to get to the recommended daily amount of water, the nationwide survey reveals almost one in 10 (7%) admit they don’t drink any water at all. Those in the baby boomer generation, aged between 55 – 73, are the most likely to not drink any water at all, with one in seven (14%) saying this is the case.

Dr Stuart’s top tips of staying hydrated this summer:

·       Be aware of the signs of dehydration such as dry mouth and dark coloured urine

·       Alongside the fluids you drink, choose foods such as fruits and vegetables which have a high-water content as this all helps to keep you hydrated throughout the day without you even thinking about it

·       The hotter you get, the quicker you’ll get dehydrated so make sure you’re dressing for the weather and don’t spend too much time out in the sun

·       If you’re going out for the day, or even just spending an afternoon at the shops, make sure you take some water with you to stay hydrated on the go

“It’s our mission here at Aqua Pura to keep the nation hydrated – especially over the summer when more people are out and about, exploring their local area. The good news is that it’s easy to keep hydrated simply by drinking water – something that is plentiful here in the UK thanks to our climate. It means we’re all able to enjoy fresh water from the hills – in our case from the Lake District – to help keep us healthy.

“In a bid to help people stay hydrated, we’ve created a hydration calculator so Brits can work out how much water they should be drinking this summer. We hope this will help people to truly understand how much water they should be drinking,” adds Kelly Hall, Aqua Pura.

To calculate how much you should be drinking, visit www.aqua-pura.com.

Continue Reading

Health

Childhood hepatitis outbreak – four more cases in Wales under investigation

Published

on

PUBLIC HEALTH WALES is investigating four more cases of acute hepatitis among children.

Health officials have identified 17 cases in Wales, an increase of four cases since the last update on 6 May.

UK Health Security Agency launched an investigation in April after hospitals reported a rise in cases of acute childhood hepatitis with no known cause.

Typically, UK hospitals see about 20 cases a year that are not caused by common hepatitis viruses, but cases this year are nearly 10 times higher.

A number of hypotheses are being investigated and the information gathered so far increasingly suggests that the rise in these cases may be linked to adenovirus infection, with other factors likely to be playing a role.

Dr Ardiana Gjini, Consultant in Communicable Disease Control for Public Health Wales, said:

“Hepatitis can cause jaundice and inflammation of the liver, so parents and carers should be aware of the symptoms of jaundice – including skin with a yellow tinge which is most easily seen in the whites of the eyes.

“We are reminding the public to familiarise themselves with this and other symptoms of hepatitis in light of these UK cases.

“In addition, the importance of maintaining normal hygiene routines, especially ensuring that children wash their hands properly, help to reduce the spread of many common infections.

“Parents and carers are reminded that they should keep their children away from school and seek advice from a GP or an appropriate specialist if their child experiences any symptoms linked with hepatitis.”

Hepatitis symptoms include:

  • dark urine
  • pale, grey-coloured poo
  • itchy skin
  • yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice)
  • muscle and joint pain
  • a high temperature
  • feeling and being sick
  • feeling unusually tired all the time
  • loss of appetite
  • tummy pain

Regular updates on the ongoing investigation into the cases in the UK can be found on the UKHSA website.

Continue Reading

Trending

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK