Connect with us
Advertisement
Advertisement

News

Llanelli could be underwater in 100 years

Published

on

Llanelli beach: Received 70mph last weekend

Llanelli beach: Received 70mph last weekend

RESEARCH carried out by Climate Central shows that some towns of Wales located on the coast could be underwater in the next 100 years.

Climate experts are warning the rise in sea levels could wipe out many of the Welsh urban areas within just a century.

Climate Central, who are an association of leading environmental scientists and journalists, have recently published new data revealing global warming could cause a sea level rise of over 6m, even with the current attempts to seriously reduce pollution.

With global temperatures increasing, expecting to rise 2-4C by 2100, environmental scientists of Climate Central warn that tidelines are to rise by 4-6 metres in the next century. If we carry on with the current approach to carbon emissions experts warn it could cause devastating impact on coastal towns in Wales, including Llanelli.

Nia Griffith MP of Llanelli said: “We already have flood defences around the coast to maintain, and it can be tempting particularly in times of economic difficulty to prioritise spending on other services, but if we do not maintain these defences, then we are storing up trouble for the future.”

This is an ever-growing danger as more than 60% of the population of Wales live in a coastal community, the advancement of sea levels rising could risk damaging coastal erosions – threatening the lives and households of more than 220,000 people in the Welsh community.

As most of the coast in Wales lies below one metre above sea level, the risk of flooding due to storm surges could cause sea levels to increase tenfold by 2090.

Nia Griffith continued: “One very vulnerable bit of infrastructure is our mainline railway track from Swansea through to Pembrokeshire, which has suffered significant storm damage in recent winters. This is a vital lifeline for west Wales, both for freight and passengers, and we must insist that it is a priority.”

The scientific community are vigorously debating over how the amount of time it will take for the impacts of coastal erosion and rising sea levels to take hold, but the overall opinion is that significant changes will start to take place within the next 100- 200 years. Research figures published by the Welsh Government body Natural Resource Wales show that by 2100, over 2126 homes could be completely lost due to coastal erosion.

Executive Board Member for the Environment Cllr Hazel Evans said: “The implementation of appropriate and effective mitigation measures to reduce the impacts of storm events is an ongoing task and will need to adapt over time as our understanding of the impacts of climate change become clearer.”

The head of earth and oceanic sciences at Cardiff University, Professor Ian Hall, warns that even if drastic reductions in carbon emissions by the UK, the loss of Welsh coastal areas may be an ‘inevitable’ consequence. Professor Ian Hall said: “It is clear that as the rate and total amount of sea level rise increases in the coming years the impact of this change will be increasingly felt.

“Our coastlines and the communities living on them will become increasingly vulnerable.

“In Wales, adapting to future sea levels will require a combination of increased flood protection for certain high value coastal assets but an acceptance that abandonment and relocation is inevitable for some.”

On November 30th, world leaders gathered in Paris to discuss and set new targets to reduce carbon emissions in the upcoming decades – their results will affect millions of lives across the world, and potentially result in species suffering due to climate change either surviving or going extinct.

Continue Reading
1 Comment

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Health

Those eligible for the Spring Covid-19 booster should get jabbed by end of June

Published

on

ALL those eligible for the Spring Covid-19 booster are being urged to take up their offer of the vaccine before the end of next month.

A deadline of 30 June has been introduced to ensure all those eligible for the spring booster will have a long-enough interval between this and the autumn 2022 booster, if they are also eligible.

An announcement by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) about which groups will be eligible for the autumn booster is due to be published shortly.

The JCVI has advised that people over-75, older care home residents and all those aged 12 years and over who are immunosuppressed are eligible for the spring booster.

Those who are 75 on or before 30 June, can get their booster at any point up to the deadline.

Health Minister Eluned Morgan said: “It is important we continue our very high take up levels of the vaccine to help protect us against the risk of serious illness from Covid-19. I would urge everyone who is offered a spring booster vaccination takes up the invitation.”

If someone eligible for a spring booster has had a Covid infection recently, they will need to wait 28 days from the date they tested positive before they can be vaccinated. They will still be able to get vaccinated after 30 June as part of this campaign if they have to postpone their appointment.

All those eligible for spring boosters will be invited by their health board or GP.

It is not too late for anyone who needs a primary dose (first, second or third) to be vaccinated.

Please check for local arrangements.

Continue Reading

Health

Young people in Wales being failed when moving from child to adult mental health services

Published

on

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES are failing young people when they move from child to adult services, says a mental health charity.

Mind Cymru is calling for Welsh Government to make urgent changes to improve the system.

Nia Evans, Children and Young People Manager at Mind Cymru, said: “Young people have told us that their needs, thoughts, and feelings about moving to adult services are often unheard, or ignored.

“Welsh Government must support Local Health Boards to make sure this doesn’t happen, change the way services are run and make sure our young people are being heard and properly cared for.”

Mind Cymru has published a report, in ate the result of interviews with young people about their experiences of moving from Specialist Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services – (SCAMHS) to AMHS.

They highlighted five key areas where services are failing young people:
– Poor information offered to young people, particularly on their rights
– Inconsistent use and follow through of care and treatment plans
– High thresholds for SCAMHS and AMHS referrals to be accepted
– Feeling abandoned / cut off from SCAMHS
– Age still dominates decision making process for moving from SCAMHS to AMHS

Nia Evans said: “Any one of these issues could make the process of moving from children’s services to adult services difficult for our young people. But often, more than one is happening at any one time.”

“Our young people have a right to care and support from a mental health system that has been put in place to help them recover. Action must be taken immediately to make sure support systems are robust and doing the job they were designed to do.”

Mind Cymru is asking people to email their Member of the Senedd (MS) and amplify the voices of these young people whose experiences are often unheard, and use the #SortTheSwitch hashtag on social media.

The full report is available here, including what a good move from SCAMHS to AMHS would look like for young people, and where the current system could improve.

Continue Reading

Business

Average UK price of diesel hits record of more than £1.80 a litre

Published

on

LESS than two months after Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced a 5p a litre cut on the average price of fuel – diesel prices have reached a record high price of 180.29p a litre.
The previous high of 179.90p was recorded on March 23rd 2022 – the day of the Spring Statement from Sunak.

In recent weeks, the UK government has tried to move away from its reliance on importing Russian oil, following President Putin’s invasion of Ukraine.

Worryingly for drivers of petrol cars, the price per litre is fast approaching the record levels of 167.3p per litre set on March 22nd.

This latest price rise adds another challenge to UK households, as the cost of living crisis continues to impact families across the country.

RAC fuel spokesperson Simon Williams said: “Sadly, despite the Chancellor’s 5p a litre duty cut the average price of a litre of diesel has hit a new record high at 180.29p.”

“Efforts to move away from importing Russian diesel have led to a tightening of supply and pushed up the price retailers pay for diesel.”

“While the wholesale price has eased in the last few days this is likely to be temporary, especially if the EU agrees to ban imports of Russian oil.”

“Unfortunately, drivers with diesel vehicles need to brace themselves for yet more pain at the pumps. Had Mr Sunak reduced VAT to 15% as we call on him to do instead of cutting duty by 5p, drivers of diesel vehicles would be around 2p a litre better off, or £1 for every full tank.”

“As it is, drivers are still paying 27p VAT on petrol and 29p on diesel, which is just the same as before the Spring Statement.”

“The average price of petrol is also on the rise having gone up nearly 3p a litre since the start of the month to 166.65p which means it’s less than a penny away from the all-time high of 167.30p set on 22 March.”

Continue Reading

Trending

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK